September 23, 2014

wapiti3:

Plant and ornamental applications / By Grasset, Eugene, 1841-1917 Verneuil, MP (Maurice Pillard), 1869-1942 , ill. on Flickr.

Publication info Paris: Librairie Centrale des Beaux-Arts, E. Levy, editor … [1896]
BHL Collections:
Smithsonian Libraries

(via jlr7245)

September 23, 2014
virginiawoolfblog:

T.S. Eliot and Virginia Woolf photographed by Lady Ottoline Morrell in June 1924

virginiawoolfblog:

T.S. Eliot and Virginia Woolf photographed by Lady Ottoline Morrell in June 1924

(via the-library-and-step-on-it)

September 23, 2014

englishsnow:

 Anna Federowicz

(via margerykempe)

10:41am  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZjEz8t1RUtwuq
  
Filed under: lovely 
September 23, 2014

hhotaru:

In love with maroon & speckled knits. {X)

(via borgevino)

September 23, 2014

Literature Meme | 1/1 Epic: Paradise Lost

What matter where, if I be still the same,
And what I should be, all but less than he
Whom Thunder hath made greater? Here at least
We shall be free; th’ Almighty hath not built
Here for his envy, will not drive us hence:
Here we may reign secure, and in my choyce
To reign is worth ambition though in Hell:
Better to reign in Hell, than serve in Heav’n.

(via thegirlandherbooks)

September 23, 2014
"And seeing you cross the quad in this direction, I turned in that direction like the needle to the North. Dark," said Mr. Pomfret, with animation, "and true and tender is the North. That’s a quotation."

— Dorothy L. Sayers, Gaudy Night

(Source: smokeandsong)

September 22, 2014
Indigenous women’s lives held cheap in Canada

nitanahkohe:

…Earlier this year, a report prepared by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police found record of 1,181 cases of missing and murdered aboriginal women from 1980 to 2012. The RCMP report affirmed what many had long suspected: indigenous women “are over-represented among Canada’s murdered and missing women.”

The total was higher than previous independent estimates, and led to renewed calls for a national inquiry to determine the root causes of the problem. Activists argue the disproportionate number represents a failure by police and government to come up with a solution. The media, as well, has been criticized for its role. A 2010 study found depictions of murdered aboriginal women were “more detached in tone” and less likely to appear on the front page than those of white women.

Beverly Jacobs, a lawyer, activist, and the former head of the Native Women’s Association of Canada, has been trying to raise awareness about the problem for years. “It’s a crisis and it always has been,” she said, blaming all levels of government, including indigenous leadership. “The numbers indicate how critical an issue it is. The fact that indigenous women are being attacked — that’s historical. This isn’t a new issue. It’s been happening since the beginning of colonization.”

…Manitoba, a prairie province with one of Canada’s largest aboriginal populations, has some of the most troubling numbers. From 1980 to 2012, nearly half (49 percent) of female homicide victims were aboriginal, according to the RCMP report. Aboriginal people comprise 16.7 percent of the population of Manitoba.

Bernadette Smith, a tall, strongly built woman with soft brown eyes, has become a leading voice among aboriginal activists in the province since her own sister, Claudette Osborne, went missing…“We’re all just people. We have families, we have a world, and we’re not disposable,” Smith said. Smith, an education consultant on aboriginal issues, has been pushing for better social programs geared toward at-risk women that would help them to break away from a cycle of drug addiction and violent relationships.

The RCMP report found that most of the homicides were “committed by men and most of the perpetrators knew their victims — whether as an acquaintance or a spouse.” Twelve percent of the victims were involved in the sex trade…“Women aren’t just on the street because they want to be,” Smith says. “They all have a story to tell.”

(via fycanadianpolitics)

September 22, 2014
"I had intended to put Princess Arjumand back in the basket, with a strong lock and some rocks on the lid for good measure. But when I’d picked her carefully up, watching out for claws and sudden moves, she’d snuggled cozily into my arms. I carried her over to the basket and knelt down to deposit her. She looked up appealingly at me and began to hum.
I had read of cats purring, but I had always imagined it as more of a low growl, or perhaps a sort of static. This had nothing unfriendly or electromagnetic about it, and I found myself apologising. “I have to put you in the basket,” I said, petting her awkwardly. “I can’t run the risk of your running away again. The universe is at stake.”
The hum increased and she laid a paw beseechingly on my hand. I carried her back over to the bed. “She’ll have to be in the basket all day tomorrow,” I said to Cyril, who had settled down in the middle of the rugs. “And I don’t think she’ll run away now that she knows me.”
Cyril looked unimpressed.
“She was frightened before,” I said. “She’s quite tame now.”
Cyril snorted.

Somewhere in the midst of worrying about the rain at the Battle of Midway, I must have fallen asleep, because I woke with a jerk to the grey light of dawn. It had stopped raining and the cat was gone.
I leaped up in my stocking feet and flung the rugs aside, trying to see if she was hidden in them somewhere, disturbing Cyril, who whuffled and rolled over.
“Cyril!” I said. “The cat’s gone! Did you see where she went?”
Cyril shot me a look that clearly said, I told you so, and subsided among the covers."

— Ned Henry realizing his obvious destiny as a professional cat handler, To Say Nothing of the Dog, Connie Willis. (via arrowsforpens)

(via smokeandsong)

September 22, 2014
"Thank you, mon enfant, my arthritis is better, in spite of the idiosyncrasies of the climate, which continues to exhibit the British illogicality and independence of enlightened cosmoploitan opinion in its most insular and insolent form."

— Paul Austin Delagardie, in The Wimsey Papers

(Source: smokeandsong)

September 22, 2014
erikkwakkel:

Medieval family portrait in ivory
Carving ivory is an art. It is difficult to shape the hard material in such a way that meaning appears, something recognizable by someone who looks at it for the first time - like you do at this very moment. Meet Engelramus (right), master carver from the eleventh century, who portraits himself carving in the company of his son, Redolfo (left). The latter holds the material while the father chops away. We know so because the information was added to the plaque: the front reads “Engelramus et Redolfo filio”, as if it were a family snapshot. Most astonishingly, this unusual piece of art, giving face, literally, to a medieval artist, is only 60x45 mm in dimensions - smaller than a deck of cards. You can almost sense the two working on this difficult piece, making themselves slowly appear - hair, eyes, beard, hands - out of the ivory. Well done guys.
Pic: St Petersburg, State Hermitage Museum (made 1060-80). More about the object and the scene here.

erikkwakkel:

Medieval family portrait in ivory

Carving ivory is an art. It is difficult to shape the hard material in such a way that meaning appears, something recognizable by someone who looks at it for the first time - like you do at this very moment. Meet Engelramus (right), master carver from the eleventh century, who portraits himself carving in the company of his son, Redolfo (left). The latter holds the material while the father chops away. We know so because the information was added to the plaque: the front reads “Engelramus et Redolfo filio”, as if it were a family snapshot. Most astonishingly, this unusual piece of art, giving face, literally, to a medieval artist, is only 60x45 mm in dimensions - smaller than a deck of cards. You can almost sense the two working on this difficult piece, making themselves slowly appear - hair, eyes, beard, hands - out of the ivory. Well done guys.

Pic: St Petersburg, State Hermitage Museum (made 1060-80). More about the object and the scene here.

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