July 29, 2014
medieval:

A nun plucks penises off a phallus tree.
Roman de la Rose, c. 1325-1353. (Paris, Bibliothèque nationale de France, MS. Fr. 25526, f. 106v.)
From Naughty Nuns, Flatulent Monks, and Other Surprises of Sacred Medieval Manuscripts.

medieval:

A nun plucks penises off a phallus tree.

Roman de la Rose, c. 1325-1353. (Paris, Bibliothèque nationale de France, MS. Fr. 25526, f. 106v.)

From Naughty Nuns, Flatulent Monks, and Other Surprises of Sacred Medieval Manuscripts.

July 29, 2014
"Would you have your youth back if you could, Harriet?"
“Not for the world.”
“Nor I. Not for anything you could give me. Perhaps that’s an exaggeration. For one thing you could give me I might want twenty years of my life back. But not the same twenty years. And if I went back to my twenties, I shouldn’t be wanting the same thing."

Gaudy Night by Dorothy L. Sayers (via smokeandsong)

July 29, 2014
"They talk about the sadness of departure; what about the guilt of arrival?"

Flaubert’s Parrot, Julian Barnes

July 29, 2014
Sperm motility under conditions of weightle... [J Androl. 1992 Sep-Oct] - PubMed - NCBI

July 29, 2014

Sitzfleisch, n. The ability to focus on a complicated skill for the length of time it takes to master it.

July 28, 2014
"After Hunton’s husband died in 1916, she volunteered for service in World War I, working in Brooklyn canteens designated for Negro soldiers. In June 1918 she became one of three African American women invited to France as YWCA welfare workers. For the next fifteen months she worked with two hundred thousand racially segregated African American troops."

— Thea Gallo Becker on Addie Waites Hunton, social reformer, educator, and unsung hero, in the African American National Biography on the Oxford African American Studies Center. We’ll be bringing you biographies of forgotten heroes from the First World War along with other information during the centenary year.  (via oupacademic)

July 28, 2014
"With great & painful firmness I have not said you goodbye from England. If you had said in the heart or brain you might have stabbed me, but you said only in the leg; so I was afraid.
Perhaps if I “write” anything in dug-outs or talk in sleep a squad of riflemen will save you the trouble of buying a dagger."

A letter from Wilfred Owen to Siegfried Sassoon (September 1, 1918).

Sassoon had told Owen that he would stab him in the leg if he tried to return to the Front, which Owen did in July 1918. He returned to active service in France and was killed in action a few months later, exactly one week before the signing of the Armistice would officially end the war.

(via the-library-and-step-on-it)

9:01pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZjEz8t1Mmwtxr
  
Filed under: owen sassoon wwi 
July 28, 2014
"War! War!—everyone at dinner discussing how long the war would last. The average opinion was 3 weeks to 3 months. Violet said 4 weeks. H. said nothing, which amazed us! I said it would last a year. I went to tea with Con, and Betty Manners told me she had heard Kitchener at lunch say to Arthur Balfour he was sure it would last over a year."

— An excerpt from Margot Asquith’s Great War Diary 1914-1916 (via oupacademic)

July 28, 2014
The First World War and the Stories We Tell

oupacademic:

image

This year marks the centenary of the beginning of the First World War. Oxford University Press is sharing numerous resources for scholars and students looking for new understanding of the war and its legacy.

Read the full Oxford Journals Virtual Issue dedicated to the First World War Centenary.

Find further resources at the First World War Centenary Hub on our UK website, World War I: Commemorating the Centennial on our US website, the University of Oxford First World War activities, the World War I Centenary: Continuations and Beginnings resource center from the University of Oxford and JISC, Bodleian Libraries’ Oxford World War I Centenary Programme, and more to come throughout 2014. 

Image credit: World War I Daily Mail Official War Photograph, Series 16, No. 123, titled “British Chaplain Writing Home for Tommy”. Public domain via Wikimedia Commons

July 28, 2014

oupacademic:

On the shelves in Oxford this week are two accounts of the early days of the First World War. The first is Gordon Martel’s The Month that Changed the World, July 1914, a gripping step by step account of the five fateful weeks that led to the Great War; the second is Margot Asquith’s Great War Diary, 1914-1916, a candid, witty, acerbic commentary on the main political players of the period.

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